Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Help

  1. #1
    I'm New Here
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    19

    Help

    Every time I put a new fish in my tank it dies I can't keep anything alive past maybe a month. Every time I test my water it comes back as perfect. I haven't tried putting anything in the tank for over a month and a half. Is it because I don't have a skimmer or something? What am I doing wrong?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    I'm New Here
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1
    How are you cycling the water? How big is the tank?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    I'm New Here
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    19
    It's a 30 long nuvo and I get the water from my work but in my tank it just goes through the regular filtration the nuvo comes with nothing is added


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Wylie
    Posts
    1,014
    Can you give us more info on the system in order to diagnose?

    How old is it? How many fish are in there? How do the fish die? What is TDS on water and salinity and salt brand? How much biofiltration do you have? You say it goes through the regular filtration. What does that mean? Are there bio balls or ceramics? Do you have liverock and sand? What are your parameter readings?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    30 gal custom rimless zoa garden, 110 gal custom rimless planted freshwater, 40 gal peninsula mixed reef pure clownfish tank, clowns, clowns, clowns

  5. #5
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    forney
    Posts
    157
    What kind of fish, and where are you purchasing them from?

  6. #6
    I'm New Here
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Landon View Post
    Can you give us more info on the system in order to diagnose?

    How old is it? How many fish are in there? How do the fish die? What is TDS on water and salinity and salt brand? How much biofiltration do you have? You say it goes through the regular filtration. What does that mean? Are there bio balls or ceramics? Do you have liverock and sand? What are your parameter readings?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The tank is like 5 months it's my new one after i tore all my old ones down and I have no fish but when they get put in there healthy for a week or so then they start to get weird looking like all filmy almost as if there slim coat is peeling or something. Sometimes it's ich but then some get like blackish spots or in my most recent case of fish they actually killed each other but that one was my fault I let a fish stay in there for a month on it's own and it got territorial (it was a small yellow tang and it lived the longest so far but the it got the slimy film stuff and then the other fish and it killed each other they were pretty beat up) the filtration is the three step sponge pads that are standard with the tank I can't really tell you more on that except it works cause my water is always perfect. The salt brand is Kent I don't know the specs on it and yes there is love rock and sand. I'd have to take to take a test on my parameters for more recent and accurate answers


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  7. #7
    I'm New Here
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by bill972 View Post
    What kind of fish, and where are you purchasing them from?
    Any kind of fish mostly nano fish like clowns or hawks and it's anywhere


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  8. #8
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    North Garland,TX ( Firewheel Area)
    Posts
    5,614
    How many fish have you had in the tank at any one time? To be honest, any tang in a 30 gallon is going to be territorial, especially towards certain other fish or fish close to its size. Tangs command space and the more the better for all the other fish. A 30 gallon tank is just too small for a fish that grows pretty fast and requires regular feedings of nori/seaweed. The tang and food alone would keep water parameters at higher than normal levels for a small tank. Adding more fish complicates matters worse, especially with your only filtration being your biological filtration as the main source for keeping wastes and nutrients down.
    The problem that you are also probably having is that the fish may already have an underlying disease that becomes much more active due to the stress and anxiety from their new environment and not so stable conditions. In my experience, getting new fish to eat 2-3 times a day helps with their health and to build up their immune system to fight off disease as they are adapting.
    What water parameters are you having tested? If you don't have a lot of corals and mainly just fish then calcium and alk shouldn't be your priority at the moment with a quality salt. Even though your tank has gone through an initial cycle that doesn't mean that it won't go through another or several since it's still a new tank. Everytime you add a fish, bacteria have to increase to keep up with demand on wastes and organics. In the first 6-12 months your tank will not be stable and will go through many different changes as it tries to find an equilibrium. Adding chemicals also is not something I would advise either unless it's for calcium or alkalinity. Maybe adding a bacteria such as microbacter or microbe lift ( sp.) to help build a bacteria population.
    I have a biocube as well and I do not run a skimmer on it. Other than water changes an filter pad, those are the only means of mechanical filtration. I feed heavy as well but there are only 2 fish in it at the moment. I don't advise heavy feeding but it's been running for much longer than yours.
    There are a lot of things that it could be as to why you keep losing fish. It could be a combination of some of the things mentioned by everyone or just one thing specifically. I would test the water for a few specific parameters before adding fish, after adding fish, during the time they are in their and if they die get a reading as soon as possible. Specifically, ammonia, nitrites, nitrates. I'd also check salinity and pH. PH is important with your bioload currently due to respiration from living organisms during overnight hours. Make sure you have a powerhead giving extra water flow needed to help break the water surface for gas oxygen exchange.

    Sent from my SM-G360T using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    I'm New Here
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by K.J. View Post
    How many fish have you had in the tank at any one time? To be honest, any tang in a 30 gallon is going to be territorial, especially towards certain other fish or fish close to its size. Tangs command space and the more the better for all the other fish. A 30 gallon tank is just too small for a fish that grows pretty fast and requires regular feedings of nori/seaweed. The tang and food alone would keep water parameters at higher than normal levels for a small tank. Adding more fish complicates matters worse, especially with your only filtration being your biological filtration as the main source for keeping wastes and nutrients down.
    The problem that you are also probably having is that the fish may already have an underlying disease that becomes much more active due to the stress and anxiety from their new environment and not so stable conditions. In my experience, getting new fish to eat 2-3 times a day helps with their health and to build up their immune system to fight off disease as they are adapting.
    What water parameters are you having tested? If you don't have a lot of corals and mainly just fish then calcium and alk shouldn't be your priority at the moment with a quality salt. Even though your tank has gone through an initial cycle that doesn't mean that it won't go through another or several since it's still a new tank. Everytime you add a fish, bacteria have to increase to keep up with demand on wastes and organics. In the first 6-12 months your tank will not be stable and will go through many different changes as it tries to find an equilibrium. Adding chemicals also is not something I would advise either unless it's for calcium or alkalinity. Maybe adding a bacteria such as microbacter or microbe lift ( sp.) to help build a bacteria population.
    I have a biocube as well and I do not run a skimmer on it. Other than water changes an filter pad, those are the only means of mechanical filtration. I feed heavy as well but there are only 2 fish in it at the moment. I don't advise heavy feeding but it's been running for much longer than yours.
    There are a lot of things that it could be as to why you keep losing fish. It could be a combination of some of the things mentioned by everyone or just one thing specifically. I would test the water for a few specific parameters before adding fish, after adding fish, during the time they are in their and if they die get a reading as soon as possible. Specifically, ammonia, nitrites, nitrates. I'd also check salinity and pH. PH is important with your bioload currently due to respiration from living organisms during overnight hours. Make sure you have a powerhead giving extra water flow needed to help break the water surface for gas oxygen exchange.

    Sent from my SM-G360T using Tapatalk
    The tang was a bad idea and I knew it was to small a tank to put in. The rocks and sand are from my original tank and are about 2 1/2 years old and I used the same water from the other tank that never had any problems my corals are really happy and growing like crazy and my 2 year old Blue Linkia star is super healthy. I test for everything and my main priorities are ph nitrates ammonia salinity and hardness. I've always used my rocks and sand from my big tank and I've down graded to a 16 and nothing ever went wrong and now I've upgraded to a 30 and it's the same rocks and sand and i used water from the other tanks. Most fish I've had in this tank at once is 3. I always tell my customers at work what to do and it has always works for them (i work at a fish store) I know what I'm talking about when I recommend things (I don't recommend tangs in small tanks but i did it in my tank cause i thought I'd try it) but for some reason I am just having problems with my tank and i can't figure out what it is.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  10. #10
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    North Garland,TX ( Firewheel Area)
    Posts
    5,614
    Quote Originally Posted by RCJXVI View Post
    The tang was a bad idea and I knew it was to small a tank to put in. The rocks and sand are from my original tank and are about 2 1/2 years old and I used the same water from the other tank that never had any problems my corals are really happy and growing like crazy and my 2 year old Blue Linkia star is super healthy. I test for everything and my main priorities are ph nitrates ammonia salinity and hardness. I've always used my rocks and sand from my big tank and I've down graded to a 16 and nothing ever went wrong and now I've upgraded to a 30 and it's the same rocks and sand and i used water from the other tanks. Most fish I've had in this tank at once is 3. I always tell my customers at work what to do and it has always works for them (i work at a fish store) I know what I'm talking about when I recommend things (I don't recommend tangs in small tanks but i did it in my tank cause i thought I'd try it) but for some reason I am just having problems with my tank and i can't figure out what it is.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Even though you transferred rock, sand and water over, a new tank is still a new tank. It still takes time for the tank to stabilize and for bacteria to re populate. Also, there isn't a lot of bacteria transferred in water. Nutrients and elements definitely but not much bacteria.
    If any of the fish that you introduced were sick to begin with then more than likely disease could have been transferred through contact or through the water column.
    Are you buying the fish from the store that you work at? If so, is there a way that you could hold them there to monitor? If you've been able to keep certain fish in your tank for at least a month with no sign of problems then the are several possibilities.
    1). The fish had an underlying problem that was not visible and only got worse with time.
    2). You had a healthy fish, introduced a sick fish and the disease persisted and eventually set in and killed the other fish as well.
    3). After the other fish were dead the disease could have still survived in your tank and as you began to add new stock it continued its cycle due to not enough time to totally die off.
    4). The stress of fish being handled, even if it's just for a short length of time, can weaken their immune system enough to cause an outbreak. Although you transferred a lot of stuff from your other system, your tank is still young and can still go through small to large cycles. Cycles cause stress and stress causes weak immunity in fish and a weak immune system allows disease and toxic wastes in the water to attack.
    There's always a reason why fish in our tanks die. Narrowing the reasons can be difficult many times and often times a lot of us never quite figure it out. I've had fish in my larger tank live for months and all of a sudden die for unknown reasons and yet all of the other fish would be fine. I'm pretty sure the problem was either due to before adding it to my tank or something occurring during its time in my tank. What the issues might have been are still a mystery.


    Sent from my SM-G360T using Tapatalk

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •